Gayle Lynds will Thrill Us @ SBWC 2016, June 6

Posted on by SBWC

sbwriters.com

Gayle - new photoGayle Lynds

Gayle Lynds will be on stage at the Santa Barbara Hyatt on Monday, June 6, 7:30 PM. She has the generous spirit one would expect of her Midwestern roots, but the page-turning espionage thrillers she writes reflect a wide canvas of world politics and culture.

Her latest award winning thriller, The Assassins,  is no exception.

Gayle is an alum of SBWC. It’s rumored she met her late husband, author Dennis Lynds, at this conference many years ago. SBWC audiences have heard her speak several times over the years. Her talks are full of great stories and practical information for writers of all genres.

Have you ever wanted to be a spy? Test your SpyQ on Gayle Lynds’ website. http://gaylelynds.com

The morning after her talk she will lead a morning workshop titled “The Villain Drives the Plot: Elements of Character.”

The June 7 morning workshop is open to registered students at SBWC (http://www.sbwriters.com/conference/ to register)

The evening talk is open to the public. Tickets $10.

 sbwriters.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ross Macdonald Literary Award Opening Night June 5 @ SBWC 2016

Posted on by SBWC

 

sbwriters.com

Ross Macdonald, creator of Lew Archer, wearing a straw hat

 

Ross Macdonald

On opening night, June 5, 2016, Santa Barbara Writers Conference will host the presentation of the Ross Macdonald Literary Award. In past years the award has been given to Ray Bradbury, Dean Koontz, Sue Grafton, Mark Salzman, Robert Crais, T.C. Boyle, and James Ellroy.

This year, the recognition will be awarded to the prolific writer Dennis Lynds who passed away in August of 2005. His widow, award winning author of political thrillers, Gayle Lynds, will receive the award on his behalf and will speak on Dennis’ writing.

He is best known under the pseudonym Michael Collins, writing the Dan Fortune novels, all of which are available in both print and ebook. He wrote in multiple genres under various names over four decades, and he is known for a literary style that transcends the genres he wrote in.

Ross Macdonald, Dennis Lynds and Gayle Lynds all have had a connection to the Santa Barbara Writers Conference, and we are pleased to celebrate this history while honoring Dennis’ fine literary style.

http://dennislynds.com

The award ceremony precedes our opening night speaker Rufi Thorpe. This event is open to the public. Tickets $10.

sbwriters.com

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

THE HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA WRITERS CONFERENCE — 1986

Posted on by SBWC

An excerpt from the upcoming book by Armando Nieto, Mary Conrad, and Matt Pallamary:

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference Scrapbook  — Words of Wisdom from Thirty Years of Literary Excellence 1973 – 2003

Thursday night was Jonathan Winters night, a Santa Barbara resident frequently seen around town, table hopping when out to dinner or entertaining other shoppers in the local grocery stores.  Before moving to Santa Barbara in the ‘70s and his first appearance at the SBWC, Jonathan had a lengthy career as a comedian and comic actor in many films, including the 1963 “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World,” and a brilliant recurring role on the “Mork & Mindy” show. By the time he moved to Santa Barbara, he was also a successful writer and painter.

As the closing night speaker, Jonathan was introduced by Barnaby Conrad who said they’d created a special Jonathan Winters Humanitarian Award for his long friendship and volunteer work in the community. Jonathan said he preferred something else, preferably in an envelope!

Jonathan began his remarks noting “the remarkable, young and healthy audience ready to face rejection.”

“I have made some notes. People think I don’t,” he added, “but I am under heavy sedation. I know I don’t look it.” He had the audience laughing at the end of almost every sentence.

What followed was a series of comedic sketches as he introduced his audience to some of the readers from around the country who would be reading the output of their labors. It is impossible to do justice to Jonathan’s renditions, but Maude Fricker is familiar to audiences around the world.

“I’m 96 years old!” she said, “and much of this body has been used by my husbands, all of them, and I have 300 children. So you see I have lived!”

He talked about his latest book, and the rejection he faced until he finally was able to get it published. Taking it up, Short Stories and Observations for the Unusual, he read, “This is a little thing called my hobby. ‘I collect rainbows…I collect winks from beautiful women…” and the audience hushed.

To listen to Jonathan Winters read from his writing is an eerie and emotional experience. He reads and writes from the fragile place in his heart, his observations of things going out of existence, or what used to be is as moving emotionally as his comedy is belly slapping.

“I am serious about my writing,” he said, “as I am sure you are about yours — or you wouldn’t be here.”

Jonathan talked about how he was always talking about writing and painting, until he finally heeded the advice that you better put it down before time runs out.

“Most of us are out of school,” he said. “So you better know that time is of the essence, and put it down.”

For those in attendance, Jonathan showed a side that most people never saw. It was impossible not to realize that within this man was a darkness and pain for the vagaries of life, and the memories of a childhood that fueled his comedic genius. It was unarguably a most special occasion, and virtually everyone in the audience was moved and grateful to be in the auditorium on the night of June 26, 1986.

June 1986 news 8June 1986 news 17

June 1986 Write On 17

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Rufi Thorpe…Opening Night @ SBWC 2016

Posted on by SBWC

d90f6c_df42d5087fdb402a94aa230725c3c96bTitles like To Fang With Love  and The Girls from Corona del Mar have intrigued me ever since I heard that author Rufi Thorpe had agreed to open the Santa Barbara Writers Conference on the evening of June 5 at the Santa Barbara Hyatt in the El Cabrillo room.

Her first novel, The Girls from Corona del Mar, was long-listed for the 2014 International Dylan Thomas Prize and for the 2014 Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize. Her second novel, Dear Fang, With Love is forthcoming from Knopf May 2016. She lives in California with her husband and sons.

And yet, she will find time to travel to Santa Barbara and share her wit and wisdom with the SBWC audience of eager writers on June 5, 2016 at 7:30 PM. This event is open to the public. Tickets $10.

Check out Rufi Thorpe’s essays and blogs at

http://www.rufithorpe.com

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Posted on by SBWC
 Sign up for Advanced Submission this Week!
Hyatt

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference: June 5-10, 2016

June 5-10, 2016
SwirlSBWC 2016: June 5-10, Hyatt Santa Barbara
Dear Writers,

This is the last week to register for the Advance Submission Program

For those of you hoping to schedule a private meeting with an editor or agent at this year’s conference, the deadline to sign up online for the Advance Submission Program is May 1. You must be a registered participant to take part. Also, all manuscripts must be mailed in no later than May 7, 2016. Visit sbwriters.com for more information.

We have ten participating agents/editors who represent a variety of genres including nonfiction and memoir. Find out more about our confirmed agents/editors by clicking on their names below: 
Corinna Barsan —Senior Editor, Grove Atlantic
Paul Fedorko— N.S. Bienstock, Inc.
Lucas Hunt — Orchard Literary
Jennifer March Soloway —Andrea Brown Literary Agency
Toni Lopopolo — Toni Lopopolo Literary Management
Jill Marr — Sandra Djikstra Agency
Angela Rinaldi — The Angela Rinaldi Literary Agency
Erin L. Cox—Rob Weisbach Creative Management
Annie Hwang —Folio Literary Management
Eric Myers —Dystel and Goderich Literary Management
We hope you’ll join us for another amazing and inspirational year.

Our 44th Year!

Snoopy

“A most stimulating time—a glorious week!”
— Eudora Welty

“The best in the nation.”
— James A. Michener

“An important and wonderful week.”
— Elmore Leonard

“SBWC offers aspiring talents opportunities to have their work seen by professionals who can help them reach publication.”
— Los Angeles Times

FacebookAdd
our rss feed to your reader
Advance Submission Deadline May 1.

Write On!
Grace Rachow and Erin Munsch

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

THE HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA WRITERS CONFERENCE — 1985

Posted on by SBWC

An excerpt from the upcoming book by Armando Nieto, Mary Conrad, and Matt Pallamary:

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference Scrapbook  — Words of Wisdom from Thirty Years of Literary Excellence 1973 – 2003

Ray Bradbury kicked off the conference with one of his more memorable lectures, at one point recalling how in a visit to his hometown of Waukegan five years past he went in to a barber shop and was accosted by the 70 year-old barber there.

“By god I’ve been waiting 40 years for you to come through that door,” the barber said. “When I was 18 years old I was a boarder in your mother’s house!”

Ray said he didn’t remember the man — “I was only three or four years old at the time after all.”

The barber said one of his favorite memories of that time was of a three-year old Ray and his brother, excited about helping their grandfather, running into the house to talk about the bags of dandelions they’d collected for the wine press their grandfather kept in the basement.

Twenty-some years later the budding writer Ray Bradbury wrote a novel entitled Dandelion Wine, wondering at the time where the idea for the story came from until he was a famous and accomplished writer in his forties visiting his home town and meeting the 70 year-old barber who reminded him of a summer afternoon when he collected gunny sacks filled with dandelions.

Ray’s speeches had a similarity and an ongoing theme that he repeated every year with the same infectious, inspiring, passion. In the process of transcribing cassettes to MP3 files, we uncovered this little gem of a segment from 2002 that was classic Ray Bradbury wisdom.

Ray Bradbury at the Santa Barbara Writers Conference in 1988

Ray Bradbury at the Santa Barbara Writers Conference in 1988

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

THE HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA WRITERS CONFERENCE — 1984

Posted on by SBWC

An excerpt from the upcoming book by Armando Nieto, Mary Conrad, and Matt Pallamary:

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference Scrapbook  — Words of Wisdom from Thirty Years of Literary Excellence 1973 – 2003

Arguably the highlight of the conference for most attendees was Alex Haley’s return to speak on closing night. As aspiring writers, the SBWC students learned that Roots was now published in 40 languages, most recently Russian in 1984.

Mr. Haley started his talk, paying homage in his soft Memphis accent, to Niels Mortensen and Barnaby Conrad with whom he’d struck up a friendship in Barnaby’s El Matador Bar in San Francisco, despite Haley’s aversion to alcohol. He confessed that although Barnaby was probably unaware of the fact, Haley had once touched Barnaby’s coat as he walked by, just to make physical contact with a real life published writer, then one day Alex came into the bar with the idea for Roots and asked Barnaby and Niels how to get an agent.

“Well, Barnaby’s got one of the best,” said Niels. “Louis Blau.”

“I can give him a call if you’d like,” Barnaby said.

Some time later Barnaby told Alex he had set up a ten-minute interview with Louis Blau.

“I can give you ten minutes,” the attorney told a nervous Alex Haley. Two hours later Mr. Blau rose and shook Haley’s hand, saying, “If you can write that story as well as you tell it you are going to have a very successful book.”

Haley told the audience that there must be some unspoken way the world knows when something momentous has happened in your life.

“Two weeks after Roots was published my agent’s office called to ask how I was,” said Haley. “And I asked them what they meant and they said, ‘well we’re just calling to see how you’re feeling.’ And no one ever cared about how I felt before Roots.”

“And I know there’s no memo that goes out to airline flight attendants, but they start asking if they can get you anything. They let you through lines quicker.”

With the burgeoning success of Roots, a lot was to change for Mr. Haley. Fresh from a visit to China, he kept the SBWC audience rapt with a rambling recitation of his life since Roots. He was in China as a guest of the government which was interested in doing a similar film production on Chinese history, for which Haley had enlisted the help of Norman Lear, but when asked what the biggest event in his career of writing was, Alex answered without hesitation. “People ask if it was winning a National Book Award, or the Pulitzer Prize, but it was something else.

“It was one of those early rejection slips,” he said. “The kind that all of you are familiar with. Everyone thinks you’re crazy, writing for years on the same idea. At that time, in the fourth year of working on Roots, I’d had at least 50-70 rejection slips.

“I went out to the post office to get the mail and I anticipated, and I was right, because when I got to the post office there was a manila envelope that I had addressed to myself. It had one of those pre-printed rejection slips, but on this rejection slip, someone had written a note in long hand with pencil that said ‘nice try,’ and, something exploded in my head, because someone had taken the time to read however many pages I had sent, and then had taken the time to write that note.”

“To this day I remember that as the biggest thrill in my writing career,” Alex said.

Everyone in the room knew exactly what he was talking about.

June 1984 news 10

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

THE HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA WRITERS CONFERENCE — 1983

Posted on by SBWC

An excerpt from the upcoming book by Armando Nieto, Mary Conrad, and Matt Pallamary:

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference Scrapbook  — Words of Wisdom from Thirty Years of Literary Excellence 1973 – 2003

As the SBWC entered its second decade Mary and Barnaby Conrad added Robert Bloch (Pscho), Larry Gelbart (MASH, Tootsie, etc.), Joshua Logan (South Pacific, etc.), and Martin Cruz Smith (Gorky Park) to the lineup of featured speakers. Most notably, conference favorite Charles “Sparky” Schulz was once again in attendance as he would not be attending Wimbledon two years in a row.

Sparky’s confederate Ray Bradbury was ready for a repeat performance, and said “this year I will wander around for the duration of the whirlwind week, try to read whatever the writers hand me, and continue to encourage them to take ideas and set them in motion.”

“Be passionate, be alive!” When Ray Bradbury opened the conference every year the emotional quotient of the audience began to soar.

Ray was the embodiment of what everyone in the room strived to be. He believed that each and everyone in the room can succeed. More than Barnaby Conrad or any other person present, Ray was the biggest cheerleader and besides his undeniable writing skill, it was his special gift.

Writers came to the SBWC for many reasons, and sometimes, they didn’t even know why they came. As Ray has said, “You come because you must!”

June 1983 news 2 June 1983 news 5

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

THE HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA WRITERS CONFERENCE — 1982

Posted on by SBWC

An excerpt from the upcoming book by Armando Nieto, Mary Conrad, and Matt Pallamary:

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference Scrapbook  — Words of Wisdom from Thirty Years of Literary Excellence 1973 – 2003

1982 was the year that Ray Bradbury opened the conference saying, “For God’s sake, be in love with something madly! Don’t talk to friends—they won’t understand. Trust your intuition. Let yourself go!”

Bradbury was big on intuition that year. “Put all your loves together and try to make sense of it.”

“Make lists of your memories—turn trivia into metaphor; build on your past—create the instant now,” he said. “Care so much it makes you want to live forever.” His advice was given with passion, and those unfamiliar with him could be forgiven if they came away befuddled, confused, or convinced he was drunk or worse.

On writing, he modified something he recalled from Hemingway: “Never go to bed with someone sicker than you.” Bradbury’s version was, “Never go to bed with anyone you’re afraid of, but if you do, write about it later!”

Ted Berkman, himself an accomplished writer and SBWC workshop leader, captured the flavor of all the workshops in his 1982 piece on the conference.

“A typical workshop finds some 35 women and men crowded around novelist Phyllis Gerbauer, a slim, calm literary rendition of Carol Burnett. The novices sit on camp chairs, kitchen bar stools, and the floor of a summery hotel suite, listening raptly to a student reading (strict limit: six pages at a time). At the end, hands shoot up, comments fly. ‘Terrific suspense.’ ‘Needs more personal emotion.’ The instructor is last to speak. She suggest more specific details — ‘the type of perfume your protagonist uses tells us something about her character’—and greater attention to the sensory elements generally. ‘But those are only suggestions; the decision is yours.’”

Local resident, Laugh-In, and Candid Camera writer Fanny Flagg was an early SBWC workshop attendee and in 1979 won the Fiction Award for a thousand-word story that was adapted into a television movie. Subsequently, she expanded the story to the novel Coming Attractions, which was published in 1982.

Fannie Flag letter

 

 

June 1982 Alex Haley

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

THE HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA WRITERS CONFERENCE — 1981

Posted on by SBWC

An excerpt from the upcoming book by Armando Nieto, Mary Conrad, and Matt Pallamary:

The Santa Barbara Writers Conference Scrapbook  — Words of Wisdom from Thirty Years of Literary Excellence 1973 – 2003

In 1981 new Santa Barbara resident and international funny man Jonathan Winters joined the speakers at the SBWC.  While well-known for his antics as a comedian, Jonathan was also an accomplished artist and writer. His autobiography, I Couldn’t Wait for Success, So I went on Without It deals with his life in Ohio, the Marines, and show business. Jonathan said he thought it was something that boys like him from Ohio could make good. He addressed the audience attired in military camouflage, wearing a jaunty beret.

“I suppose you are wondering why I am dressed like this,” he said. “We are living in violent times. Many of us are begging to get paranoid. I’ve always been paranoid. I was in the Marines.”

His love for his home and Ohio was very real. At age seven he shook hands with Orville Wright, and forty years later he shook hands with Neil Armstrong—both born in Ohio. “To me,” Jonathan said, “that’s America—the fact that a man from a little tiny town in the Middle West was the first man to step on the moon. I think its much chic-er than for someone from New York, Chicago, St. Louis or San Francisco to do it.”

June 1981 news 7

1988 Pic8

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment